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HOW HAS 3 YEARS OF FULL-BLOWN MARIJUANA HARMED COLORADANS?

AUG. 31, 2016 — (From the U.S. government’s Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area reportHere are the highlights in just three years since legalization:

  • Marijuana-related traffic deaths increased 48 percent.
  • Over 20 percent of all traffic deaths were marijuana related compared to only 10 percent six years ago.
  • Marijuana-related emergency department visits increased 49 percent.
  • Marijuana-related hospitalizations increased 32 percent.
  • Marijuana-related calls to the Rocky Mountain Poison Center increased 100 percent.
  • Diversion of Colorado marijuana to other states increased 37 percent by vehicle and 427 percent by parcels.
  • Colorado youth now rank number one in the nation for marijuana use and 74 percent higher than the national average.
  • Colorado college-age group now rank number one in the nation for marijuana use and 62 percent higher than the national average.
  • Colorado adults now rank number one in the nation for marijuana use and 104 percent higher than the national average.

LEGALIZATION IN COLORADO = ALARMING LEVELS OF POT AMONG TEENS

MARCH 6, 2013 — (CBS4 Denver) “I’ve seen a lot more people just walking down the street smoking (joints),” high school student Irie Johnson said. “In high school it has kind of gotten out of hand,” student Alaina Tanenbaum said. Experts say the test results show that children are getting higher than ever with alarming levels of THC, marijuana’s active ingredient, in their bodies. “A typical kid (is) between 50 and 100 nanograms. Now were seeing these up in the over 500, 700, 800, climbing,” Jo McGuire said. More

LEGALIZING MARIJUANA IS A BAD IDEA

Marijuana bosses are moving beyond “medicinal marijuana” and now want to usher in a FULL-BLOWN marijuana culture to forever change society. They want the next generation to think it’s “normal” to “get high.”Studies show marijuana is a gateway drug to cocaine and meth. Teens and young adults are especially at risk from today’s potent, mind-altering marijuana, which can permanently damage their developing brains and young lungs. If pot is legalized, your health and auto insurance will likely cost more because increased addictions, accidents, and drug rehab will burden all Californians. “Drugged driving” will become commonplace. It will be a new “right” to get high on marijuana at work, even in transportation jobs. Marijuana legalization means cities and counties can OK selling pot in grocery stores and permit marijuana operatives to buy thousands of acres of farmland. See documentation of these facts.

POT 3X STRONGER THAN 20 YEARS AGO

FEB. 8, 2016 — (Live Science) Pot is becoming more potent, a new study suggests. In the study, the researchers looked at more than 38,600 samples of illegal marijuana seized by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration over 20 years. They found that the level of THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol — marijuana’s main psychoactive ingredient — in the marijuana samples rose from about 4 percent in 1995 to about 12 percent in 2014. More

PROP. 64 THREATENS YOUNG BRAINS

SEPT. 2, 2016 — (Robin Abcarian, Los Angeles Times) As Californians ponder whether to vote for Proposition 64, the November ballot initiative that would legalize marijuana for adult use, it’s important to own up to the fact that marijuana is not always the benign bud that many advocates would have us believe, particularly for teens and young adults, whose brains are still developing. Proposition 64 proposes safeguards against sales to those under 21, but the minimum age for obtaining a doctor’s recommendation for medical marijuana is 18, and that will not change with legalization. Opponents say delivery services such as Eaze, which have sprouted all over the state, will make it easy for minors to skirt the law. More

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Lei Green, 32, a single mother of 7 kids, says pot ruined her family
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Robert, a former marijuana user and seller, says marijuana hurts children
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True stories of young adults who were harmed by smoking pot as a teen

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